Focus on Healthcare Finances Will Only Get Greater

Margin pressures are not new to healthcare organizations. As hospitals and health systems wait in limbo as the healthcare reform debate continues, they will only increase. A recent Becker’s Hospital Review article highlights the need for health systems to continue to find ways to re-structure in order to find added value and remain viable: Activity-based costing, team commitment, understanding the drivers of work and embedding cost savings into operations.

It also lists 10 areas that the author recommends health systems target for maximum cost improvement: Manage the healthcare cost of your own workforce, eliminate subscale services, optimize service line spend, maximize IT spend, flex the workforce, find the waste, reconsider capital spend, reduce the cost of leakage, reduce bad debt and avoid potential costs.

Read More

Systemness: Integrating to deliver seamless, cost-effective, high quality care

Systemness is a term that is being used more and more frequently in healthcare. The word itself is a bit clumsy, but its meaning very much affects our industry.

A recent post from the Advisory Board Company describes it this way, “at its essence, systemness is about integrating all aspects of a health system’s governance, operations, and workflows—across all technologies, clinicians, and locations—to deliver seamless, cost-effective, high-quality care.”

The Advisory Board recently conducted a survey of over 150 health system executives, and the conclusion was that those leaders said, “in no uncertain terms that their organizational success depends on greater integration, and greater integration depends on their ability to do concrete things that reduce variation, improve coordination, and improve the flow of information.”

Read More

How Will Recent Healthcare Legislation Disrupt How Labs Conduct Business?

Over the past couple of years, I have often written about the challenges confronting hospitals and health systems as a result of the Affordable Care Act. And now, new legislative changes in healthcare laws are impacting another segment of the healthcare supply chain: laboratories.

Two weeks ago in New Orleans, the 19th Annual Executive War College on Laboratory and Pathology Management brought together 800 clinical laboratory professionals and pathologists. One of the major topics covered was the legislation passed by Congress and recently signed into law by President Obama called “Protecting Access to Medicare Act of 2014” (PAMA). In his keynote address, Robert L. Michel, founder of the Executive War College, said that PAMA is the single biggest change to the clinical laboratory industry in more than 25 years.

Read More
Google+